The Most Dangerous Games: The White Kimono Game

Previously: Sever the Cord

The White Kimono Game reminds me a little bit of the Corner Game  in that they both utilize the four corners of a room to summon a spirit; the difference is that the White Kimono Game is a single-player game, so if you’ve been having trouble finding folks willing to try the Corner Game with you, this one is a reasonable alternative. Admittedly I’m not totally sure why you’d want to summon the spirits described in either game, as you don’t seem to get anything out of it other than bragging rights if you survive… but maybe that’s the point. Remember that whole tempting fate thing? I suspect it comes down — yet again — to that.

For the curious, the particular kind of white kimono Japanese ghosts are often depicted wearing is called a kyōkatabira. It’s basically a funeral shroud — the kimono in which people’s earthly remains are wrapped before burial.

Advertisements
Read more "The Most Dangerous Games: The White Kimono Game"

Encyclopaedia of the Impossible: Eight Feet Tall

Previously: La Pascualita.

Type: Unknown. Subject displays traits characteristic of both PE and EV classifications; however, due to insufficient information, a classification is not able to be made at this time.

Period/location of origin: Conflicting. Earliest known documentation of subject appeared on the internet on Aug. 26, 2008; however, events detailed in this documentation occurred in 1998. It is unknown whether subject came into being prior to 1998, in 1998, or on Aug. 26, 2008. (See also: Kunekune; the Slender Manthe Smith Sisters, Murdered Anonymously; etc.) Determination: Inconclusive.

Geographically, subject is believed to originate in Japan.

Appearance: Subject appears to be a tall, thin, female humanoid wearing a white dress and a hat. The details of subject’s appearance vary by account; according to some, subject is an old woman dressed in a tattered kimono, while according to others, subject is a youthful young woman draped in a funeral shroud. Subject is precisely eight shaku in height. (Note: A shaku is a Japanese unit of measure equal to 11.9 inches.)

Read more "Encyclopaedia of the Impossible: Eight Feet Tall"

Haunted Globetrotting: The Many Spirits Of Kiyotaki Tunnel, Japan

Welcome to Haunted Globetrotting, an international version of the United States-based Haunted Road Trip feature I run here at The Ghost In My Machine from time to time. Now that we’ve been at it for a few years, it seems like it’s about time to broaden our travel horizons a little, doesn’t it? First stop: Japan.

Running between Arashiyama and Sagakiyotaki in Japan’s Kyoto Prefecture is a tunnel. It’s unremarkable in appearance (as these places tend to be); to the casual observer, it looks like a simple, covered through-way — albeit rather a narrow one — connecting one town to the next. But to those who know the stories attached to it, it’s quite remarkable indeed — because Kiyotaki Tunnel has a reputation for being one of the most haunted places in Japan.

Read more "Haunted Globetrotting: The Many Spirits Of Kiyotaki Tunnel, Japan"

Creepypasta of the Week: “The Girl In The Drawing”

Previously: “The River Country Film.” 

I struggled with what to call this one. It doesn’t really have an official name; it appears all over the internet under a variety of titles, from “The Scariest Picture on the Internet” to “Japanese Girl’s Suicide Drawing.” (For what it’s worth, I dislike this last one intensely; I think it’s enormously insensitive.) “The Girl in the Drawing” feels right to me, though — it’s a little more descriptive than just “The Scariest Picture on the Internet” (which, let’s face it, could refer to a lot of things), but evocative enough to make us want to know more.   

Read more "Creepypasta of the Week: “The Girl In The Drawing”"

The Most Dangerous Games: Japanese New Year Ritual

handPreviously: Dry Bones

Technically I should probably put this one in quotation marks — “Japanese New Year Ritual” — because I haven’t been able to confirm that it actually is a Japanese New Year ritual and not just a creepypasta (possibly written by someone who isn’t actually Japanese) masquerading as one. Besides the fact that I’ve only been able to find this one on creepypasta sites and places like Wattpad, the thing that kind of makes me think it’s more creepypasta and less ancient mythology is how it deals with food. I’m by no means an expert, but from what I’ve read, food factors prominently in Japanese New Year celebrations — traditional dishes and a whole lot of mochi are typically eaten in the days leading up to the ringing in of the new year. This “ritual,” however, does the opposite — it instructs players to fast, which seems at odds with everything else I’ve read.

But then again, maybe that’s the point.

As always, play at your own risk.

Read more "The Most Dangerous Games: Japanese New Year Ritual"

Encyclopaedia of the Impossible: Kunekune

scarecrow-2Previously: Spring-Heeled Jack.

Type: PE (Pretenatural Entity).

Period/location of origin: Conflicting. In the early 2000s, sightings reported in rural Japan began appearing on the internet; however, it is unclear whether subject originated in rural Japan, where the sightings were located, or on the internet itself, where the “sightings” were reported. Additionally, it is not known whether subject came into being in the early 2000s with the appearance of the online reports, or whether subject is much older and existed prior to the reports.

Appearance: Unknown; reports are conflicting. In some accounts, subject appears to be only a
“white squiggle” swaying in the distance of a garden, field, or, rarely, the open sea. In others, however, subject appears to be a scarecrow. Very rarely, subject may appear in an urban landscape, in which case it is reported as being as black as pitch.

What subject may look like up close has never been documented. Anyone who may have found themselves close enough to report has… not been in any condition to do so afterwards.

Read more "Encyclopaedia of the Impossible: Kunekune"