Haunted Road Trip: Peg Entwistle and the Hollywood Sign

hollywood-2

Previously: The Sallie House.

It’s a fixture of the landscape: 45 feet high and 350 long, stark white against the surrounding brush of Mount Lee, yet harmonious with the blue of the sky above it. It imparts one message, but also many — so much conveyed in just one word: “Hollywood.”

Of course, the Hollywood sign wasn’t always the Hollywood sign; it’s fairly common knowledge by now that originally, it was the Hollywoodland sign. It also wasn’t necessarily meant to stand the time in quite the way it has: It was, after all, originally just an advertisement for a real estate development. But it has become iconic — if there’s one thing people think of when they think of L.A., it’s the Hollywood sign — and, as is often the case with iconic places and things, it’s also gotten a reputation for being haunted. Given Hollywood’s long, storied, and often seedy history, it’s not surprising that its most notable landmark might have this sort of reputation — but if you had to pinpoint where it all began, it always comes back to one person: Peg Entwistle.

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Encyclopaedia of the Impossible: The Girl from the Gap

door crackPreviously: Mel’s Hole.

Type: CC (corporeally challenged)

Period/location of origin: Unknown, Japan.

Appearance: Subject appears to be an extremely slender female humanoid of indeterminate age. She may or may not hold an ice pick. NOTE: Due to subject’s illusive nature, a more precise description has yet to be identified; anyone who might be able to provide such a description has hitherto been… not in a position to do so.

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Are Taxi Drivers In Japan Really Picking Up The Ghosts Of The 2011 Tsunami? A Look At The Legend Of The Vanishing Hitchhiker

Taxis

An interesting little story has been circulating the Internet for the past couple of weeks: Apparently taxi drivers in Ishinomaki, Japan have reported picking up the ghosts of the victims of the 2011 tsunami and earthquake that caused the Fukushima nuclear disaster. I think there’s a lot of fascinating stuff to unpack here, so let’s take a look, shall we?

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Haunted Road Trip: Boy Scout Lane, Stevens Point, Wisconsin

Boy Scouts

Previously: The Morgan-Monroe State Forest.

In Stevens Point, Wisconsin, there’s a stretch of road that runs through the woods. It is unpaved, with little around it to recommend itself. But many will still often wander down it, curious to see whether the stories connected to it are true. It’s called Boy Scout Lane, and it is on this small, otherwise unremarkable stretch of road that a group of Boy Scouts some 20 years ago are believed to have lost their lives — and, it’s said, remain stuck, unable to “cross over” due to the unfortunate circumstances of their demise.

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Haunted Road Trip: The Morgan-Monroe State Forest, Stepp Cemetery, And The Lady in Black Of Bloomington, Indiana

Stepp cemetery

Previously: Mount Misery Road and Sweet Hollow Road.

In the Morgan-Monroe State Forest just north of Bloomington, Indiana, there lies a small cemetery. It’s not uncommon to find old burial grounds deep in the woods, or even in state forests; the Jennings State Forest in Florida, for example, has not one, not two, but four cemeteries within its nearly 24,000-acre grounds. But although cemeteries are often found in the forest, and although many cemeteries have at least one spooky story associated with them — I suspect it has something to do with our fundamental need to explain death to ourselves — you’d likely pass right by Stepp Cemetery if you didn’t know about it. Like the Jennings State Forest, Morgan-Monroe covers 24,000 acres, but Stepp Cemetery itself houses a mere 32 graves. Those 32 graves, though? They’re not quiet. In fact, according to the legends, they’re downright chatty.

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Encyclopaedia of the Impossible: The Salt and Pepper Lady

old woman windowPreviously: Cow Head.

Type: CC (Corporeally Challenged)

Period/location of origin: Early to mid-1980s, Devine, Texas.

Appearance: Subject appears to be an old woman once known by the name Ramona Osterburg, or, more commonly, “Mona.” At one point, subject was a resident of a low-income apartment complex in Devine; however, subject expired at subject’s own hands circa 1984. Subject may be seen either as she appeared in life — elderly, with stringy, grey hair, blue eyes, and an unsettling grin — or as she appeared upon discovery of her death — wrists slit, waterlogged, and with no eyes at all. Subject is known colloquially as “The Salt and Pepper Lady.”

Modus operandi: Subject may be active in myriad ways, typically at night or in the early morning hours prior to sunrise. Targets may witness subject doing any or all of the following:

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The Most Dangerous Games: Daruma-san, or The Bath Game

bathtubPreviously: The Staircase Ritual.

Daruma-san, also known as The Bath Game, is probably best described as a deadly version of Red Light, Green Light. After the initial summoning ritual has been performed, it follows the basic rules of a Japanese children’s game called Darumasan ga Koronda — literally, “The Daruma doll fell down.” The player is “it,” while Daruma-san attempts to catch “it.” But if Daruma-san catches you… well, let’s just say you should never, EVER let that happen.

Curiously, Daruma or Dharma dolls are traditionally symbols of good luck. The Daruma-san of this game, however, seems not to carry the same good luck as her namesake—and neither, should she catch you, will you.

As always, play at your own risk.

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