‘The Creepypasta Collection, Volume 2’ Edited By MrCreepyPasta Takes Online Horror Offline (Review)

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Creepypasta fascinates me for a variety of reasons, one of which is this: It’s no longer confined to the internet. The short story collection The Creepypasta Collection, Volume 2, edited by YouTube favorite MrCreepyPasta, recently hit shelves, so when a copy of it landed in my inbox, I was happy to check it out. In some respects, I’m sort of surprised that collections like this one haven’t become more common — although in others ways, perhaps that’s understandable. Authorship when it comes to creepypasta can be… tricky.

We’ll get to that in a bit, though. First, some details and my thoughts on this particular collection:

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Creepypasta of the Week: “Suicidemouse.avi”

Previously: Classics, Vol. 1.

You probably already know “Suicidemouse.avi”; it’s an early creepypasta, and known for being the one that introduced the immensely popular “Lost Episode” subgenre of the form. It dates back to 2009, with the uploading of the video seen here and the circulation of a short tale to accompany it.

I took a deep dive — and I do mean a deeeeeep dive — into exactly what makes this one resonate as strongly as it does here, so head on over there if you want to get up close and personal with it. Or, just enjoy it for what it is by reading on.

It’s interesting how many notable creepypastas focus on Disney gone wrong, isn’t it?

So do any of you remember those Mickey Mouse cartoons from the 1930s? The ones that were just put out on DVD a few years ago? Well, I hear there is one that was unreleased to even the most avid classic Disney fans.

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Creepypastas of the Week: Classics, Vol. 1

Previously: “The Girl in the Drawing.”

Let’s do something a little different today: Instead of looking at one longer story, let’s explore a couple of shorter ones — all of which are creeypasta classics. They’re some of the earliest and/or most well-known examples of the genre; in most of the cases, we don’t know who wrote them or where they originally appeared, but they’re true creepypastas in that they’ve been copied and pasted time and time again, and thus shared so frequently that they’ve become part of the very fabric of web culture.

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Creepypasta of the Week: “The Girl In The Drawing”

Previously: “The River Country Film.” 

I struggled with what to call this one. It doesn’t really have an official name; it appears all over the internet under a variety of titles, from “The Scariest Picture on the Internet” to “Japanese Girl’s Suicide Drawing.” (For what it’s worth, I dislike this last one intensely; I think it’s enormously insensitive.) “The Girl in the Drawing” feels right to me, though — it’s a little more descriptive than just “The Scariest Picture on the Internet” (which, let’s face it, could refer to a lot of things), but evocative enough to make us want to know more.   

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Creepypasta of the Week: “The River Country Film”

river-country

Previously: “The Woman in the Oven.”

The history behind “The River Country Film” is all true: Walt Disney World’s original water park, River Country opened on June 20, 1976, predating later Disney water parks Typhoon Lagoon by 13 years and Blizzard Beach by nearly two decades. Although it was smaller than Typhoon Lagoon and Blizzard Beach, it had a certain charm to it; designed to resemble an old time-y swimming hole, it did what Disney does best: Look back with nostalgia at an extravagantly romanticized vision of yesteryear — or perhaps more accurately, a past that never was.

Over time, though, it began to struggle in comparison with the newer water parks; what’s more, attendance for Walt Disney World as a whole dropped off dramatically post-9/11, ands River Country suffered quite a bit as a result. The park ran its regular season throughout the rest of 2001 — but in April of 2002, the Orlando Sentinel reported that the park may not reopen. It stayed closed throughout 2002 and languished for another few years; then, on January 20, 2005, Disney finally confirmed the fact that the park was permanently closed.

What’s so fascinating about the closure, though, is that the park has never subsequently been demolished.

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Creepypasta of the Week: “The Woman in the Oven”

oven

Previously: “Misfortune.GB.”

Let’s start the new year off with a blast from the past, shall we? “The Woman in the Oven” — sometimes simply referred to as “The Tape” — is one of the oldest creepypastas around. Its original author remains unknown; indeed, there are several versions of it floating around, so at this point, there’s no telling how many authors it actually has at all. For what it’s worth, the oldest version I’ve found dates back to June of 2008 — two full years before I even learned what creepypasta even was. That’s the version I’ve reproduced here — in full, purely because the tale is so short.

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Creepypasta of the Week: “Misfortune.gb”

game-boy-2

Previously: “Trick Or Treat.”

Although most creepypastas eventually find their way to — or even originate from — the Creepypasta Wikia, “Misfortune.gb” is one of the few pastas I know of that capitalizes on the medium itself: It’s written in the form of a Wiki page. For that reason, it’s one of the most effective pastas I’ve ever read when it comes to blurring the line between fact and fiction. The last section is where we get a bit of a departure from that particular format… but the departure is where the story’s kick in the gut comes from, too.

And it’s a good one.

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