The Most Dangerous Games: El Juego Del Libro Rojo, Or The Red Book Game

Previously: The Dark Music Ritual.

This is one of those times that I really wish I’d studied Spanish as a foreign language in school: I’ve been unable to verify the history of this one because of the language barrier. (Latin and French will only take you so far.) That said, when you search “El Juego Del Libro Rojo,” many, many more results pop up than when you search “The Red Book Game,” so even though I’ve been unable to read these results without the (rather imperfect) aid of Google Translate, I feel reasonably secure in saying that, yes, it probably does in fact originate from Spanish-speaking countries.

According to one source, El Juego Del Libro Rojo is specifically a South American thing; South America is a big continent, though, so I don’t know whether it’s a regional game or not. Additionally, other sources cite is as being played primarily in Mexico, so reports are conflicting. In any event, its closest analogue for English-speaking readers is probably the Ouiji Board, or maybe Charlie, Charlie — that is, it’s a divination game, wherein players consult an otherworldly power for information about… pretty much whatever you feel like asking.

Be warned, though: Information doesn’t always come free.

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The Most Dangerous Games: 11 Miles

road-2Previously: Japanese New Year Ritual.

(By request.)

Ritual pastas tend to fall into two camps: Games you read about because they’re good stories, and games you read about because it seems like you might actually be able to play them. 11 Miles is definitely the former.

There’s secondary set of categories, too, by which ritual pastas can be similarly divided: Games that are made-up internet shenanigans, and games that stem from history or folklore. Here, too, 11 Miles is definitely the former.

But although it might be clearly made up, 11 Miles also follows a longstanding tradition of journeys in folklore, legend, and mythology: Journeys to get your heart’s desire; journeys to return home; journeys to get your heart’s desire that result in returning home because you didn’t realize that returning home was what you wanted all along. I keep thinking back to The Odysseya much longer trip than 11 measly miles, for sure… although perhaps only in the literal sense.

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The Most Dangerous Games: Frequently Asked Questions, Vol. VI

bell book candle

Previously: Frequently Asked Questions, Vol. V

It’s been a few months; time for an update, I think. A lot of folks have had some interesting questions about how these games and rituals might interact — e.g., what happens if you play a game that ends with you, say, needing to avoid mirrors, and then try to play a game that involves a lot of mirrors? Most of my answers to these sorts of questions are purely conjecture, I’m afraid — but it’s a fascinating line of thought. I’d love to hear any theories anyone else might have, as well, so do feel free to comment if you’ve got one.

Also, on a slightly unrelated note: Many thanks to all the post-wedding well-wishers! Your kind words are all very much appreciated.

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The Most Dangerous Games: Japanese New Year Ritual

handPreviously: Dry Bones

Technically I should probably put this one in quotation marks — “Japanese New Year Ritual” — because I haven’t been able to confirm that it actually is a Japanese New Year ritual and not just a creepypasta (possibly written by someone who isn’t actually Japanese) masquerading as one. Besides the fact that I’ve only been able to find this one on creepypasta sites and places like Wattpad, the thing that kind of makes me think it’s more creepypasta and less ancient mythology is how it deals with food. I’m by no means an expert, but from what I’ve read, food factors prominently in Japanese New Year celebrations — traditional dishes and a whole lot of mochi are typically eaten in the days leading up to the ringing in of the new year. This “ritual,” however, does the opposite — it instructs players to fast, which seems at odds with everything else I’ve read.

But then again, maybe that’s the point.

As always, play at your own risk.

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The Most Dangerous Games: Dry Bones

bonesPreviously: A Small Radio.

There are a couple of versions of Dry Bones floating around on the internet, but the oldest one I’ve found dates back to 2013. It was posted to r/NoSleep in June of that year by a Redditor going by the name “yomomma56.” (Reddit user names are endlessly entertaining.) They’re still active, by the way, so at least we know that they’ve played the game and survived.

The game itself is sort of like a hybrid of One Man Hide and Seek, the Midnight Game, and Bloody Mary; the stakes are high, but the prize might be valuable enough to justify it — it all depends on your own wants and desires. Be careful what you wish for, though; it’s possible that whatever you’re summoning here might decide that playing the game isn’t fair bargain for what you’re asking for.

As always, play at your own risk.

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The Most Dangerous Games: A Small Radio

Previously: Channel Infinity.

Normally I wouldn’t post a second game quite so soon after posting the last one, but guess what? It’s October. And October means it’s Halloween season. And since it’s Halloween season, now seems like a good time to look at “A Small Radio.” I mentioned it briefly last year, but due to a lot of Big Life Changes, I wasn’t able to cover it in time for Halloween 2015. I put it on my to do list for the following year, though, and, well… here we are. 

Originally posted to the Creepypasta Wikia by user MacaroniArtZombeh in August of 2013, this game can only be played on a very particular day; trying to do it at any other time will result in a failed attempt. So I figured I’d put it on your radar now, at the beginning of the month, so you have plenty of time to get ready for the Oct. 30 start date. You don’t need much to get it started — just yourself, an outdoor location, and a cell phone. If all goes as planned, the rest of the supplies will be provided to you if and when you need it.

Then again, though, I’m not totally sure you’ll want to play it. Like several of the other games we’ve looked at here, this one is a recipe for luck… but luck never comes without a price.

As always…

…Well, you know how it goes.

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