Haunted Road Trip: The Harden House — Or Is It Hardin House? — Of Clermont, Florida

Previously: The Hollywood Sign.

The haunting of Harden House in Clermont, Fla. begins, as so many of these tales do, with a tragic history — with a crime, and with a victim. And whether what’s haunting the property is a literal ghost or a metaphorical one, there’s no denying how much a place’s past can affect how we feel about it in the present.

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The Most Dangerous Games: El Juego Del Libro Rojo, Or The Red Book Game

Previously: The Dark Music Ritual.

This is one of those times that I really wish I’d studied Spanish as a foreign language in school: I’ve been unable to verify the history of this one because of the language barrier. (Latin and French will only take you so far.) That said, when you search “El Juego Del Libro Rojo,” many, many more results pop up than when you search “The Red Book Game,” so even though I’ve been unable to read these results without the (rather imperfect) aid of Google Translate, I feel reasonably secure in saying that, yes, it probably does in fact originate from Spanish-speaking countries.

According to one source, El Juego Del Libro Rojo is specifically a South American thing; South America is a big continent, though, so I don’t know whether it’s a regional game or not. Additionally, other sources cite is as being played primarily in Mexico, so reports are conflicting. In any event, its closest analogue for English-speaking readers is probably the Ouiji Board, or maybe Charlie, Charlie — that is, it’s a divination game, wherein players consult an otherworldly power for information about… pretty much whatever you feel like asking.

Be warned, though: Information doesn’t always come free.

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Encyclopaedia of the Impossible: The Black-Eyed Children

Previously: The Cooper Family Falling Body.

Type: PE (Preternatural Entity)

Period/location of origin: Late 1990s, Abilene, Texas, United States; however, some reports throughout history may trace subjects back much further and in many other countries.

Appearance: Subjects appear to be children, typically between the ages of 10 and 13, although sometimes as young as 6 or as old as 18. They may be of any gender, and many have any hair color or texture or skin tone; they are dressed in the styles popular for children of the era in which they are encountered. Subjects typically travel in pairs, although small groups have also been recorded. They are generally unremarkable, but for two details: Their demeanor, which is unusually confident, and their eyes.

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Creepypastas of the Week: Classics, Vol. 1

Previously: “The Girl in the Drawing.”

Let’s do something a little different today: Instead of looking at one longer story, let’s explore a couple of shorter ones — all of which are creeypasta classics. They’re some of the earliest and/or most well-known examples of the genre; in most of the cases, we don’t know who wrote them or where they originally appeared, but they’re true creepypastas in that they’ve been copied and pasted time and time again, and thus shared so frequently that they’ve become part of the very fabric of web culture.

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