The Most Dangerous Games: Japanese New Year Ritual

handPreviously: Dry Bones

Technically I should probably put this one in quotation marks — “Japanese New Year Ritual” — because I haven’t been able to confirm that it actually is a Japanese New Year ritual and not just a creepypasta (possibly written by someone who isn’t actually Japanese) masquerading as one. Besides the fact that I’ve only been able to find this one on creepypasta sites and places like Wattpad, the thing that kind of makes me think it’s more creepypasta and less ancient mythology is how it deals with food. I’m by no means an expert, but from what I’ve read, food factors prominently in Japanese New Year celebrations — traditional dishes and a whole lot of mochi are typically eaten in the days leading up to the ringing in of the new year. This “ritual,” however, does the opposite — it instructs players to fast, which seems at odds with everything else I’ve read.

But then again, maybe that’s the point.

As always, play at your own risk.

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Encyclopaedia of the Impossible: Kunekune

scarecrow-2Previously: Spring-Heeled Jack.

Type: PE (Pretenatural Entity).

Period/location of origin: Conflicting. In the early 2000s, sightings reported in rural Japan began appearing on the internet; however, it is unclear whether subject originated in rural Japan, where the sightings were located, or on the internet itself, where the “sightings” were reported. Additionally, it is not known whether subject came into being in the early 2000s with the appearance of the online reports, or whether subject is much older and existed prior to the reports.

Appearance: Unknown; reports are conflicting. In some accounts, subject appears to be only a
“white squiggle” swaying in the distance of a garden, field, or, rarely, the open sea. In others, however, subject appears to be a scarecrow. Very rarely, subject may appear in an urban landscape, in which case it is reported as being as black as pitch.

What subject may look like up close has never been documented. Anyone who may have found themselves close enough to report has… not been in any condition to do so afterwards.

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Creepypasta of the Week: “Misfortune.gb”

game-boy-2

Previously: “Trick Or Treat.”

Although most creepypastas eventually find their way to — or even originate from — the Creepypasta Wikia, “Misfortune.gb” is one of the few pastas I know of that capitalizes on the medium itself: It’s written in the form of a Wiki page. For that reason, it’s one of the most effective pastas I’ve ever read when it comes to blurring the line between fact and fiction. The last section is where we get a bit of a departure from that particular format… but the departure is where the story’s kick in the gut comes from, too.

And it’s a good one.

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Abandoned: The Real Estate Bubble And America’s Zombie Subdivisions

zombie-sub-2

Previously: Bodie, California.

Although we wouldn’t officially know it until the end of 2008, a recession began in the United States in 2007. As anyone who lived through it knows, it was a bad one, claimed by many to be the worst financial crisis we’d seen since the Great Depression—  and the effects of this crisis can still be seen in a chillingly literal way scattered across the landscape of the entire country: What are called “zombie subdivisions.” Half-finished housing developments, deserted and lonely, have become the modern-day equivalent of the gold rush ghost town, and they’re just as eerie as their older cousins. In fact, in many cases, they’re even eerier — because they’re not something out of our past, with the distance history can provide. They’re our present, and if we’re not careful, they’ll be our future, too.

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