Encyclopaedia of the Impossible: Cow Head

steer skullPreviously: The Blind Maiden Website.

Type: Verbal Virus (VV)

Period/location of origin: Unknown, Japan. Some accounts state that subject dates back to the Meiji period or before; others, however, suggest that subject may have emerged during the 1960s. The truth of subject’s origin has not yet been determined.

Appearance: Subject is apparently a story called “Cow Head” which is so terrifying that it drives anyone who either hears it or tells it insane; targets may also expire shortly after either hearing or telling it. Subject’s details — that is, the substance of the story, etc. — remain unknown.

Subject may alternatively be known as “Ushinokubi,” “Ushi no kubi,” or “Gozu.” Subject should not be confused with the Ukranian folktale of the same name.

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Abandoned: Kings Park Psychiatric Center, Long Island, New York (Photos)

John Bencina/Flickr>/i>

Previously: The Ghost Ship McBarge.

I realize that perhaps a disproportionate number of the locations I’ve been dealing with in “Abandoned” are former hospitals or psychiatric centers. There’s just something about them that gets me like nothing else, although what exactly that “something” is, I’ve never been able to articulate. Maybe it’s because of the sheer number of memories that must imbue them — all those people, for all those years… I don’t know. But whatever it is, the Kings Park Psychiatric Center on Long Island in New York has it.

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The Most Dangerous Games: Frequently Asked Questions, Vol. II

bell book candle

Previously: Frequently Ask Questions, Vol. I.

A surprising number of questions about all these Most Dangerous Games have found their way into the comments section since the last FAQ I posted, so now seemed like a good time for another one. Again, I’m by no means an expert, and these aren’t be-all, end-all answers; they’re my best guesses, based on what we know about the games themselves and what we know about rituals in general. Speaking of, I’ve also added a “General” category to cover a few of the questions that address overarching themes that carry through from game to game.

Got something else you want answered? Leave it in the comments and I’ll see what I can do.

General:

Why is 6am always the safe hour?

It’s generally believed that it’s harder for anything… shall we say, not of our world to cross over to it during the daylight hours. The sun has typically either risen or is in the process of rising by six o’clock in the morning — although you might want to wait a little longer if you play any of these games in the dead of winter. On the winter solstice, for example, it’s not unusual for the sun to rise around 7:30.

When you finish or abort a game, are you safe for good?

Not necessarily. Remember, most of these rituals involve inviting dangerous things into your home — and once they’ve been invited in, it’s really hard to get them to leave, even if you complete or abort the game (this, I suspect, is also why some games should never be played more than once). The Midnight Man is probably the best example of a guest who likes to stick around, even after his game has been completed; the same is true of Daruma-San.

The safest thing, of course, is just not to play any of them.

…But then, you wouldn’t be here if you didn’t get at least a tiny bit of a thrill from the danger.

What happens if you ignore any red flags?

You don’t want to know.

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Creepypasta of the Week: “The Theater”

abandoned cinema

Previously: “Annie96 Is Typing…”

“The Theater” is one of the first creepypasta stories I ever read. I have no idea who wrote it; I also don’t know how long it’s been floating around the Internet, although I know it’s been around for at least five years (2010 is roughly when I first discovered creepypasta). It’s not particularly terrifying, but it’s certainly weird — and the payoff at the end is what bumps it from merely an odd story to one with some darker undertones. 

A word of advice: Don’t bug the Ticket-Taker.

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